Saturday, 15 September 2012

A Couple of Interesting Nessie Documentaries



An old video from perhaps the late 1990s has been posted on LiveLeaks and I am not sure of its title or provenance but it is an enjoyable watch as old footage from years of reports and searches are shown. The documentary is sceptical and ends with the Sturgeon theory, which I guess is a monster of sorts (a subject worthy of  a future post no doubt).

Look out for Lachlan Stuart being interviewed at about 9m40s into the video (picture above). Quite topical considering the current posts on his photo and personalises the story a bit. You will also find the ubiquitous Alex Campbell, Tim Dinsdale and others featuring to varying degrees.



Another YouTube clip I saw is from a series of videos called "Mysterious Planet" whose 21st episode concentrates on the Loch Ness Monster. Now this clip has interest for me personally as they give time to the "eel head" interpretation of the photo that was first publicised on this blog. Based on that, the editor proposes the Giant Salamander theory which seems to have gained some traction recently (I suspect the editor had read this post I previously publicised).



This is not the first video I have seen that publicises the Hugh Gray eel head, so it is nice to see the word getting out on this important piece of Loch Ness Monster evidence.


9 comments:

  1. If you think that Nessie is a giant frog,then change the name of your blog,there are 85 lakes where plesiosaur-like creatures have been reported,when Rines saw Nessie in 1972,he saw a huge hump with a skin of an elephant.He was the only one to bring conclusive evidence of the Loch Ness Monster´s existence,flipper,body,head and long neck.Photographs from the 50s and 60s,including this one,have all been proven to be hoaxes.What´s more,The Hugh Gray photograph always looked like a hoax at first sight.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think Nessie is a giant frog, but if anyone has an opinion which attempts to explain Nessie (which doesn't resort to logs, dogs, goats and boats) it will get aired here.

      And I would not be so confident about broad brushing all 50s and 60s photos as hoaxes.

      Delete
    2. See what happened,it started with the surgeon´s photograph (hoax),it finished with George Edward´s photograph (hoax).If you take one photograph,then take a set,show me how the creature moves.I think that the Mansi´s photograph of Champ in 1977 is legitimate.Skeptics say it´s a log or even a man with a suit,and they are right,only one photograph is not enough...and that´s the problem with photographs from the 50s or 60s.It seems that the Loch Ness monsters have died,there are almost no sightings these days,and I´m sorry to say it´s too late to find these wonderful creatures.Are there giant eels? Yes,in lake Crescent.Are there large surgeons?Yes,in lake Lliamna and in some lakes in Siberia.But evolved plesiosaurs are lost jewels,and Loch Ness,Lake Champlain,Okanagan,Erie,etc...have been their homes.

      Delete
    3. Actually Claudio, I think you have your blogs confused. Mine is the one supporting a giant amphibian theory (salamander, not frog) and I think it's aptly named, as is GB's for his own content.

      Lamentable as this is, the Rines photos were discredited quite a few years ago, and that can be found on the Internet. The flipper pictures were airbrushed (added by hand) over photos of the Loch floor, while the simultaneous sonar contact was actually due to the sonar being aimed at the floating camera rig (contrary to what the press and experts at the time were lead to believe). And the Gargoyle Head shot was a tree stump that can still be located and photographed at the same spot - in fact it has been. Sorry to be the first to tell you!

      Steve

      Delete
  2. Closed minded, when one believes in one conclusion and one conclusion only. And to close off yourself to only the plesiosaur theory is being more closed minded than those who believe it does not exist. There are many problems with the plesiosaur and even evolved plesiosaur theory, an air breathing marine reptile would need to surface to breath a bit more often than the rare occasions it has been spotted over the years, also i dont know of any aquatic reptiles that lay eggs in the water, generally they lay eggs on land, perhaps plesiosaurs give live birth but that is something we dont know we can only infer as to how other reptiles function today, if like other marine reptiles like the sea turtle, the plesiosaur would come ashore and lay eggs in the sand, and im sure that would be no easy task for something considerable larger than a sea turtle, because sea turtles have a hell of a time doing. And yes i know there have been land sigjtings but if you break down those sightings i do not think a plesiosaur would be capable of navigatinging very far from the shore with its flippers considering the wieght of the creature. However a giant salamander can fit into quite a few of sighting descriptions, and salamanders are much more prehistoric looking to people than frogs, tails could be mistaken for a long neck, or the head and body could be streched above the water to appear like that bevause you dont see the rest of the picture, so domt be so quock to scoff, as much as i would love to find a living dinosaur i also leave myself open to other interpertations, the problem i have now with lake champlaine is the recent discovery of echo location in the lake and there is no evidence of reptiles marine or terrestrial having that ability, thats not to say they never did but again i must infer what i know about the creatures living today, and today marine mammals echo locate and thts about it. Keep an open mind is the lesson of today you might find that in doing so when the truth comes out you may find it stranger than anything you ever thought it could be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Life finds it´s own way.Leave the salamanders for the Discovery Channel.

      Delete
    2. I disagree. We all have the right to do our own research. Life will still find its own way, it always has.

      Delete
  3. It's great to see these documentaries (even if some of their facts are a wee bit dodgy - over 1000ft deep?). Fascinating to see the famous Lachlan Stuart.

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete